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sex

‘Surviving R. Kelly’ Documentary on Lifetime Details Sex Abuse Accusations

R. Kelly has consistently denied allegations of sexual misconduct with women and young teenagers, even as he has settled lawsuits.CreditCreditScott Legato/Getty Imagesption
5 minute read. 

For more than two decades, the R&B singer Robert Kelly, who performs as R. Kelly, has faced accusations of sexual misconduct and abuse.

This week, a six-part documentary on Lifetime is taking an expansive look at the allegations against Mr. Kelly, a chart-topping artist whose history has invited extra scrutiny in recent years.

The series, “Surviving R. Kelly,” includes testimony from several women who accuse the singer of abuse, as well as commentary from Mr. Kelly’s critics, including the founder of the #MeToo movement, Tarana Burke, and the singer John Legend.

The six episodes, each an hour long, cover the long history of allegations against Mr. Kelly. They feature women who described being controlled or abused by him, often when they were teenagers, as well as associates and relatives of the singer.

Mr. Kelly has continuously denied the allegations against him.

The documentary has become the subject of widespread attention and fierce debate on social media, with many expressing gratitude to the women who continue to tell their stories.

“I wish that he would experience a kind of social death, and that people who still vociferously declare him innocent — or their favorite artist, or worthy of having his work separated from who he is — that they are denied that,” said dream hampton, an executive producer of the documentary.

The six parts of the series were scheduled over three days of broadcast, from Thursday through Saturday. The third and fourth episodes focused on Mr. Kelly’s 2008 child pornography trial and the sex tape at its center. The fifth and sixth episodes examine more recent allegations and follow parents who were trying to free their daughters from Mr. Kelly’s influence, Ms. hampton said.

While some fans of Mr. Kelly still defend him, many critics say that he has escaped the consequences of his actions for far too long.

“No one cared because we were black girls,” the writer Mikki Kendall said in the documentary.

[Here is a timeline of the accusations against Mr. Kelly.]

Ms. hampton agreed that race was an integral part of this story. She added that black boys and girls in the United States are often perceived as older than they are, and referenced Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old boy who was shot and killed by a police officer in Cleveland in 2014.

“We know black boys are perceived to be older than they are by police, and we absolutely do an equivalent thing to black girls,” Ms. hampton said in an interview Friday. “We perceive them to be more sexual at an early age. We perceive them to be older. And that is rooted — there is no other way to say it, and it’s not hyperbole to say — it’s absolutely rooted in this country’s history of slavery, which has gone on longer than it hasn’t.”

Mr. Kelly was still featured as an artist on the RCA website on Saturday. The label did not immediately respond to a request for comment, and a representative for Sony Music, which oversees RCA Records, declined to comment. Mr. Kelly’s management also declined to comment.

His team has previously said it would “vigorously resist this attempted public lynching of a black man who has made extraordinary contributions to our culture.” Mr. Kelly is not currently facing criminal charges.

In 1994, when Mr. Kelly was 27, he married Aaliyah Haughton, who was 15 but was listed as 18 on a wedding certificate, according to Vibe Magazine. The marriage was annulled in 1995. Ms. Haughton, who was a popular singer in her own right, died in a plane crash in 2001.

Mr. Kelly was accused of having sex with a teenager in a lawsuit in 1996, and again in 2001. Both lawsuits were settled, but the music critic Jim DeRogatis, who reported on them, continued to investigate the accusations against Mr. Kelly.

The singer Aaliyah, seen here in 2000, was reportedly married to Mr. Kelly in 1994, when he was 27 and she was 15.CreditGeorge De Sota/Liaison, via Hulton Archive

[Here is a New York Times Popcast interview with Mr. DeRogatis.]

In the documentary, people who knew R. Kelly claim that during the 1990s and 2000s, associates of the famous singer knew that he liked to prey on underage girls.

In 2002, a video that appeared to show Mr. Kelly having sex with a teenage girl and urinating in her mouth was sent to Mr. DeRogatis at The Chicago Sun-Times, which reported that the footage was being investigated by the Chicago police.

Later that year, Mr. Kelly was indicted by a grand jury in Chicago for child pornography. He pleaded not guilty, and for more than five years his case did not make it to trial. During that time he released albums including “Chocolate Factory,” which contained the chart-topping song “Ignition (Remix).”

Arguments in the 2008 trial centered on whether the man shown in the video was indeed Mr. Kelly, and whether the girl’s identity or her age could be verified. The jury decided that the girl, who did not testify, could not be identified, and Mr. Kelly was found not guilty.

In the documentary, one juror was asked about the women who had said, during the trial, that they also were victimized by Mr. Kelly when they were young. “I just didn’t believe them, the women,” the juror answered. “I know it sounds ridiculous. The way they dress, the way they act — I didn’t like them.”

R. Kelly waved to fans while being escorted from Cook County Court in Chicago in 2002.Credit – Charles Bennett/Associated Press

For years after the trial, Mr. Kelly continued to perform. In 2017, an article by Mr. DeRogatis in BuzzFeed News reported on allegations that the singer was controlling several young women by taking away their phones and limiting contact with their families. That same year, a campaign of protests, in person and on social media under the hashtag #MuteRKelly, began to pick up steam. In 2018, Spotify announced that it would remove Mr. Kelly from its official playlists, though his music would remain on the streaming platform.

A screening of the Lifetime documentary in Manhattan last month was called off after anonymous threats were called in to the venue, CNN reported.

The documentary’s producers include Ms. hampton, Tamra Simmons, Brie Miranda Bryant, Joel Karsberg and Jesse Daniels, according to Lifetime.

Some of the people featured in the documentary, including Mr. Legendand the columnist Jamilah Lemieux, have pointed people to organizations like A Long Walk Home, a Chicago-based nonprofit working to end violence against girls and women; and Girls for Gender Equity, a nonprofit that has created a guide for viewers of the documentary, including those who are survivors of sexual assault.

Joe Coscarelli contributed reporting.

Categories
sex

#HearMeToo: How Can I Deal With Sexual Harassment On Campus?

Staff Writer | Nust ZW
5 minute read

What is sexual harassment?

Sexual harassment includes any unwanted sexual behavior​—including touching or even making comments of a sexual nature. But sometimes the line can be blurred between teasing, flirting, and sexually harassing.

Do you know the difference between them? Take our  sexual harassment quiz and find out!

Sadly, sexual harassment doesn’t always stop when you graduate from school. However, if you develop the confidence and skills you need to deal with sexual harassment now, you’ll be prepared to deal with it when you enter the workforce. And you might even stop a harasser from hurting others!

What if I’m being sexually harassed?

Sexual harassment is more likely to stop if you know what it is and how to react to it! Consider three situations and how you might deal with each one.

SITUATION:

At work, some guys who were much older than I am kept telling me that I was beautiful and that they wished they were 30 years younger. One of them even walked up behind me and sniffed my hair!”​—Tabitha, 20.

Tabitha could think: ‘If I just ignore it and tough it out, maybe he will stop.’

Why that probably won’t help: Experts say that when victims ignore sexual harassment, it often continues and even escalates.

Try this instead: Speak up and calmly but clearly tell your harasser that you won’t tolerate his speech or behavior. “If anyone touches me inappropriately,” says 22-year-old Taryn, “I turn around and tell him not to touch me ever again. That usually catches the guy off guard.” If your harasser persists, be firm and don’t give up. When it comes to maintaining high moral standards, the Bible’s advice is: “Stand firm, mature and confident.”​—Colossians 4:​12The New Testament in Contemporary Language.

What if the harasser threatens to harm you? In that case, don’t confront him. Escape the situation as quickly as possible, and seek the help of a trusted adult.

SITUATION:

When I was in the sixth grade, two girls grabbed me in the hallway. One of them was a lesbian, and she wanted me to go out with her. Although I refused, they continued to harass me every day between classes. Once, they even pushed me up against a wall!”​—Victoria, 18.

Victoria could have thought: ‘If I tell anyone about this, I will be labeled as weak, and maybe no one will believe me.’

Why that thinking probably would not have helped: If you hold back from telling someone, the harasser may continue and even go on to harass others.​—Ecclesiastes 8:11.

Try this instead: Get help. Parents and teachers can give you the support you need to deal with your harasser. But what if the people you tell don’t take your complaint seriously? Try this: Every time you are harassed, write down the details. Include the date, time, and location of each incident, along with what the harasser said. Then give a copy of it to your parent or teacher. Many people treat a written complaint more seriously than a verbal one.

SITUATION:

I was really afraid of this one boy who was on the rugby team. He was almost two meters (6.5 ft) tall, and he weighed about 135 kilograms (300 lb)! He got it into his head that he was going to ‘have me.’ He pestered me almost every day​—for a whole year. One day, we were the only people in the classroom, and he started closing in on me. I jumped up and ran out the door.”​—Julieta, 18.

Julieta could think: ‘That’s just the way boys are.’

Why that probably won’t help: Your harasser is unlikely to change his behavior if everyone thinks it’s acceptable.

Try this instead: Resist the temptation to laugh it off or to respond with a smile. Rather, make sure that your reaction​—including your facial expression​—makes it clear to your harasser what you will and will not tolerate.

Sexual harassment quiz

“In middle school, boys would pull on the back of my bra and make derogatory comments​—like how much better I would feel once I had sex with them.”— Coretta.

Do you think that those boys were

  1. Teasing?

  2. Flirting?

  3. Sexually harassing her?

“On the bus, a boy started saying nasty things to me and grabbing me. I smacked his hand away and told him to move. He looked at me like I was crazy.”— Candice.

What do you think that this boy was doing to Candice?

  1. Teasing?

  2. Flirting?

  3. Sexually harassing her?

“Last year, a boy kept telling me that he liked me and that he wanted to go out with me, even though I constantly told him no. Sometimes, he rubbed my arm. I told him to stop, but he wouldn’t. Then, while I was tying my shoe, he smacked my rear end.”​— Bethany.

In your opinion, was this boy:

  1. Flirting?

  2. Teasing?

  3. Sexually harassing her?

The correct answer to all three questions is C.

What makes sexual harassment different from flirting or teasing? “Sexual harassment is one-sided,” says a girl named Eve. “It continues even when you tell the person to stop.” Harassment is serious. Not only can it affect your grades and health but it can also lead to sexual violence.

Curated from JW.ORG
Categories
NEWS sex

Suicide after lecturer ‘beds student’s girlfriend’

Patrick Chitumba, Midlands Bureau Chief
One minute read

A FINAL year Local Government student at Midlands State University allegedly hanged himself from the roof truss at his lodgings in Nehosho area in Senga early yesterday morning for unknown reasons.

Walter Temera

Speculation is, however, rife that Walter Temera killed himself in anger after allegedly finding one of his lecturers bedding his girlfriend. It is also said that he was in debt and possibly saw suicide as the only way out.

Midlands Provincial police spokesperson Inspector Joel Goko said reasons why he allegedly took his life were unknown adding that police investigations were underway.

“Yes I can confirm that an MSU student was allegedly found hanging from the roof truss of the toilet at a house where he was staying with other school mates. There are a lot of theories being thrown around but police investigations are underway,” he said.

MSU director of information Mrs Mirirai Mawere also confirmed the sudden death.

“Yes I can confirm the death of one of our students. It’s now a police case and under investigation, “she said.

Students close to the matter said that Temera had travelled to Victoria Falls with other students on an educational tour arriving back in Gweru around 2AM.

“Word is that he tried to jump off a moving bus when they were returning from Victoria Falls but was restrained by other students. The reasons for wanting to commit suicide by jumping off a moving bus are unknown,” said a student on condition of anonymity.

He said when the bus arrived at the Gweru Main Campus – it was suggested that Temera should spend the rest of the night under the watch of his best friend at the Main Campus.

“He allegedly sneaked out of his best friend’s room and went to his lodgings in Nehosho. This morning, he started apologising to his friends for all the wrongs he had done to them telling them that he lived a ‘fake’ life. Then around 7:30AM he was found hanging from a truss in a toilet,” said the student.

However, the student said his neighbour told the police that Temera owed some students money which he was failing to pay back.

Insp Goko appealed to members of the public especially students to consult elders or their lecturers when they face problems.

“It is unfortunate that members of the society resort to such extreme measures in the face of challenges. As police we urge members of the public especially these students to value the sanctity of live. In the face of problems they must consult school authorities, elders in the community, their guardians or the police,” he said.

 

Categories
CURRENT AFFAIRS

Catholic university students strike

Lungile Ngwenya
One minute read

Catholic University of Zimbabwe (CUZ) students in Bulawayo temporarily brought business at the institution to a halt after they staged a demonstration over alleged unfair distribution of resources.

The Bulawayo campus was temporarily shut down Thursday morning by students in protest over alleged preferential treatment of the Harare campus.

The students wrote a petition to the institution stating their discontentment towards the treatment they have been receiving from the university`s management.

The institution’s director a Mrs Simango, met with the disgruntled students at the campus entrance in a bid to address some of the grievances raised by the students.

A part two student at the university (name withheld) said they want equitable distribution of resources at all the campuses countrywide.

She said the protest was a result of the institution not addressing their grievances.

According to the petition written to the university`s management, the students alleged that they were exposed to “unhealthy living conditions” and “female students are complaining about sexual harassment from male lecturers…”

“Shortage of furniture at the campus leading to students moving furniture from one room to another, unreliable internet connection and expensive canteen students need competitors (sic),” read part of the petition.

“There is more preferential treatment for Harare campus than Bulawayo for example when Harare campus students are coming to Bulawayo, they come with one or two buses but when its about Bulawayo going to Harare only a handful students will go, we need explanations why it is like that (sic)”.

The students vowed to continue with the strike if their grievances are not addressed by the university authorities.

Originally published on www.cite.org.zw
Categories
CURRENT AFFAIRS

An Apology Is Not Enough For Sexual Harassment Ariana, Please Press Charges